SO WHAT IS GOING ON THEN?!

As some of you know, TREEZ is a work in progress. It evolves every year depending on what has worked or not. One of the things we were trying to improve on was the survival rate of the trees planted along the streams.

Previously, each year we have planted and then topped up where necessary. We have paid for each job; ie: clearing, pitting, planting, maintaining etc but we wanted the groups to be more involved, to take ownership of these trees. So last year we decided that we would pay for each seedling that had survived by counting each tree and seedling a year later.



And so we counted, and between the 2 groups, over 7,000 trees survived.Â


A huge CONGRATULATIONS :)))



A few years ago, we started sponsoring the Happy Hammers, a local football team, in exchange for assistance with firefighting and general help with environmental education and tree planting.

We then added the Berries FC.

And then we added each teams' respective netball teams.


In case you are wondering: for every football team in Malawi, there is a netball team.


Most of you who have visited Malawi, would know that the women do most of the work, in all areas of life; whether it be in the home, with the children, or in the fields. The women are responsible for making things happen. They are the movers and the shakers, but they are the unsung heroins.

Everything they do is expected of them, that is Malawian life.


So, we figured that we should get the women involved and, as expected, they do most of the work on behalf of their male team mates.


And as we got the women involved, I decided to help them further and try to obtain sports bras for them as these are very hard to find here.


And the response to my quest has been overwhelming: Thanks to Caroline Finch and her family, and to Jean Hake, we are able to provide more teams with bras than initially expected :)


 And now we have just taken on Kasonga, a football and netball team from the other side of the Plateau, who we hope are going to help in mitigating the number of fires in the next dry season.